CHAPTER 16

THE BARBEE FAMILY

SEVENTH GENERATION

69     Amelia W. (Carson) BARBEE was born on Nov. 30, 1832 in Alabama. She appeared on the census of 1850 in Harrison Co., Mississippi.  She died on 26 Aug., 1889 in Hamilton Co., Texas, and was buried in the Barbee Cemetery, Hamilton County, Texas.  (Her photo is in the album on this website)

She was married to (111) John Gaston BARBEE in 1852 in Leon County, Texas. He was born on 9 Sept., 1832 in Jones County, Tennessee. He was living in Leon County, Texas in 1851. John was on the first boat to sail up the Trinity River to Leon County in 1851. He moved his family to Hamilton County in 1859 where he bought a large tract of land along the Bosque River and stocked it with large herds of cattle and sheep. (His photo is in the photo album on this website)

He served in the Confederate States Army between 1861 and 1865 as a private in Company G, 30th Texas Cavalry, Gurley’s Regiment, First Texas Partisans. He served with distinction in Gan’s Brigade under Captain Goodrich.

In 1880 John was engaged in the lumber, hotel, grocery, and mercantile business in Hico, Texas  and still devoted much of his time to the cattle raising industry. He died on 11 Aug., 1921 in Mercedes, Texas, and is buried in the Barbee Cemetery, Hamilton County, located on the M.I. Knudson farm about one-half mile from the home, still standing, that John Gaston Barbee built. Considering that he named a son “John Wesley”, they most likely were Methodists. Children of Amelia W. (Carson) BARBEE and John Gaston BARBEE were:
+112     Electious Adolphus ”Doss” BARBEE
+113     James M. BARBEE
+114     Cornelia (Barbee) THOMPSON
+115     Olivia Amanda (Barbee) DAY
+116     Amelia Jessie (Barbee) SMITH
117      Willis Albert BARBEE was born on 1 Feb., 1863 and died on 13 Dec., 1864, in
Hico, Hamilton Co., Texas, and is buried in the Barbee family cemetery.
+118     John Wesley BARBEE Sr.
      286     Safronia BARBEE was born on 16 Feb., 1861 and died on 6 Oct., 1870, in Hico,
Hamilton County, Texas, and is buried in the Barbee family cemetery.
1589     Infant Girl #1 BARBEE was born and died on 26 Dec., 1873 (twin with #2)
1590     Infant Girl #2 BARBEE was born and died on 26 Dec., 1873 (twin with #1)
1591     Cornelia BARBEE was born on 29 Feb., 1876 and died on 1 Jan., 1877. (It is
not known why they named her Cornelia when her sister Cornelia was still alive.)

After Amelia’s death, he married (1592) Olivia R. (Stovall) BARBEE on 30 Sept., 1894.  It is believed that Stovall was her married name from her previous marriage.  


EIGHTH GENERATION

112         Electious Adolphus ”Doss” BARBEE  was born on 20 July, 1862 in Hico,
Hamilton County, Texas.  According to birth records of his children, his name
actually was “Electious”.  He died on 16 Feb., 1937 in Mercedes, Texas and was
buried in Hico Cemetery, cemetery plot 02-038-1.  He was married to (1596)
Sally Eleanor (Wood) BARBEE on 16 March, 1892 in the Baptist Church,
Hico, Texas.  Sally was born on 8 May, 1867 and died on 30 May, 1938 in San
Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. They had the following children:
+1620    William Terry BARBEE
+1621    Herman Adolphus BARBEE
+
1622    Leroy BARBEE
                 +1623    Paul Henry BARBEE

113         James M. BARBEE was born on 20 Dec., 1856, and died on 2 Jan., 1880 in Matador,
Texas.  [Please see the addenda to this chapter concerning his death in a gunfight.]

114         Cornelia (Barbee) THOMPSON was born on 29 Oct., 1858 in Leon County,
Texas, and died on 7 Sept., 1946 in Hico, Hamilton Co., Texas.  She is buried in the
Hico Cemeter, plot 03-007-8  She was married on (1595) William Terry
THOMPSON 
on 6 March, 1878 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.  He was born on 21
April, 1848 in Alabama.  He died on 6 Nov., 1903 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas,
and was buried in Hico Cemetery. He was 6 months old when he was brought to
Texas, Jasper County, Smith County, Bosque County, and then to Hico.  Their
children were:
1609    John THOMPSON
+1610    Fred Terry THOMPSON  
+1611    Willie Amelia (Thompson) COX 
1612    Infant THOMPSON was born on 19 April, 1886 and died a month later on
18 May, 1886 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas
+1613    Dora Lela (Thompson) WRIGHT
+1614    Daisy Edith (Thompson) DANKERS
1615    Infant Girl THOMPSON was born and died on 1 Aug., 1891.  She is
buried in the Barbee family cemetery
+1616    Lydia Clara (Thompson) MAHON 
+1617    James W. THOMPSON
+1618    Gladys Jewell (Thompson) CANNON was born on 4 July, 1898
1619    Dora THOMPSON was born in 1887

115         Olivia Amanda (Barbee) DAY was born on 18 Jan., 1854 in Leon Co., Texas,
and died on 30 May, 1923 in Hico, Hamilton Co., Texas.  She was buried in Hico
Cemetery, let 11-002-2.  In July of 1867, Indians attacked the school at Warlene
Valley on the Leon River and murdered the teacher, Miss Ann Whitney.  Olivia was
captured and the Indian put her behind him on a horse, and when his attention was
distracted by a call from some of his companions, she slid off and ran into the dense
underbrush, where she was found some 24 hours later by settlers who were searching
the area.

In the Hamilton County Courthouse, Deed Record
DPQ205, Olivia Amanda Barbee entered the following:
“Pleasant Hill, Hamilton Co
Apr. the 28th 1872
Dear Father & Mother & to all hoom it may concern.  That I do this day pledge
my Sacred Word & honor that I Olivia Amanda Barbee will never run away or
mary one Wm. Day of said county without my Father’s consent & if I relinquish
all of my right & title to all of My Father & Mothers property to them & further
more I forsake my Father & Mother & all of the family for life & never will I expect
to be allowed to come to my Fathers House any more while life last him as he so
much opposed to my marrying a boy who has never thought the first time of what
it takes to take care of a wife. I do sign this with my own consent & free will.
Olivia Amanda Barbee
Witness:
Amelia Barbee”

Apparently there was a reconciliation, for she married  (1594) William Frazier DAY.
 He was born on 30 Dec., 1854 and died on 8 Jan., 1913 in Nolan County, Texas.  They
had the following children:
1628   Bessie L. DAY was born on 27 Dec., 1874
+
1629   William A. DAY
+
1630   John Walter DAY
+
1631    Sallie (Day) NOAH
1632   Villetta DAY was born on 16 Sept., 1885
1633   Stella DAY was born on 17 July, 1889 and died on 24 January, 1890
+
1634   Charles Robison DAY
+1635   Hood V. DAY
                1636   John W. DAY was born on 10 May, 1880 and died on 11 July, 1935

116         Amelia Jessie (Barbee) SMITH was born on 1 Jan., 1869 in Hico, Hamilton
County, Texas. She died on 4 Feb., 1887 In Hamilton Co., Texas, and is buried in
Hico Cemetery, plot 4-017-2.  She was married to (1597) William Henry
SMITH 
on 14 Sept., 1887 in Hamilton County, Texas.  He was born on 30 Sept.,
1868 in Rusk County, Texas, the son of James Henry SMITH and Retinsa Ann
Greer (Carter) SMITH.  He died on 19 Jan., 1941 in Hico, and was buried in Hico
Cemetery.  They had the following children:
+1624    Willie Amelia (Smith) WALKER
+
1625    John Henry SMITH
                 +1626    Ila (Smith) WIGINTON
                 +1627    Cornelia “Nela” (Smith) LACKEY

118         John Wesley BARBEE Sr. was born on 17 June, 1856 in Hamilton County, Texas.
He died on 24 July, 1904 and was buried on 24 July, 1904 in Fairy Cemetery, Fairy,
Texas.  He was married to (216) May Lydian “Mollie” (Fulford) BARBEE, the
daughter of S. J. Fulford and Louisa M. (Duckworth) Fulford.  She was born on 12
Oct., 1859 in Georgia.  She died on 22 April, 1932  in unknown and was buried in Fairy
Cemetery, Fairy, Texas.  Her tombstone reads: “Mollie L. Barbee Saylors”.  Their
children were:
1598    Edna Lee BARBEE was born on 8 Feb., 1877 and died on 8 Jan., 1878
1599    William Henry BARBEE was born on 3 Nov., 1878 and died 5 days later.
+1600   Willis Albert BARBEE
+1601    Minnie Myrtle (Barbee) ABLE  
+ 1602    Henry Edd Curtis BARBEE  
+1603    John Wesley BARBEE Jr.
1604    Luetta “Lula” BARBEE was born on 1 Aug., 1891 and died on 21 April,
1906 in Fairy, Texas, and is buried in the Fairy Cemetery.
+1605   Jesse Gaston BARBEE Sr.
1606    Olivia Amanda BARBEE was born on 28 June, 1896 and died on 9 Sept.,
1912 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and is buried in the Barbee family
cemetery
+1607    Stephen “Doug” BARBEE  
+1608    Vada Leon (Barbee) PINGLETON

NINTH GENERATION

1600      Willis Albert BARBEE was born on 26 Dec., 1880 and died on 20 Feb., 1936. He
was buried in Fairy Cemetery, Fairy, Texas.  He was married to (1646) Ina Ona
(Haught) BARBEE 
on 16 May, 1908 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.  Ina was
born on 10 Jan., 1878 in Lawrence County, Missouri.  Some sources give a birth date
of 1878.  She died on 18 Dec., 1962 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and is buried
in Fairy Cemetery, Fairy, Texas.  They had the following children:
1647    Claude Willis BARBEE was born on 2 Feb., 1910.
1648    Inez BARBEE was born on 2 March, 1913 and died the same day.
1649    Ina Amelia BARBEE was born on 15 Sept., 1914
1650    Milton BARBEE was born on 7 July, 1916 and died on 5 Jan., 1917 in
Hamilton County, Texas.

1601      Minnie Myrtle (Barbee) ABLE was born on 1 April, 1886 and died on 8 March,
1956.  She was married to (1651) E. Joseph ABLE on 9 Nov., 1897.  He was born
on 18 Sept., 1878 and died on 25 Nov., 1949.  They had the following children:
1652    Bernell Massie “Nip” ABLE was born on 20 Sept., 1919 in Hico, Texas,
and was twin to Bernice Able
1653    Bernice Ferguson “Tuck” ABLE was born on 20 Sept., 1919 in Hico,
Texas and died on 23 July, 1987. She was twin to Bernell Able.
1654    Mattie ABLE
1655    Jessie ABLE
1656    Joe ABLE
1657    Mollie ABLE
1658    Bill ABLE
1659    Ellington ABLE

1602       Henry Edd Curtis BARBEE was born on 1 Oct., 1884 in Hico, Hamilton County,
Texas and died on 17 April, 1918 in Hico, and is buried in Fairy Cemetery.  He was
married to (1660) Amy Vonnie (Haught) BARBEE on 19 Aug., 1907 in Comanche,
Texas.  She was born on 21 April, 1883 in Summerville, Missouri, and died on 20
February, 1967 in Waco, McClennan County, Texas.  She is buried in Alter Cemetery,
Gatesville, Texas.  They had the following children:
1661    Evelyn Cordelia BARBEE was born on 25 March, 1908
1662    Lila Edna Mae BARBEE was born on 12 Feb., 1910
1663    Vonnie Liddie BARBEE was born on 14 June, 1913
1664    Noble Edward BARBEE was born on 1 Aug., 1917               

1603      John Wesley BARBEE Jr. was born on 14 Feb., 1887 in O’Brien, Haskell Co.,
Texas, and died in 1933 in Texas.  He was buried in Fairlawn Cemetery, Amherst,
Texas.  He was married to (1665) Eula Viola (Crow) BARBEE on 27 July, 1907
in Hamilton County, Texas.  She is buried in Fairlawn Cemetery, Amherst, Texas.
They had the following children:
1666    Bonnie Beatrice BARBEE 
1667    Charles Monroe BARBEE was born on 19 Feb., 1909
1668    Sylvia Grace BARBEE was born on 12 Oct., 1911
1669    Mary Odessa BARBEE was born on 2 July, 1914
1670    John Wallace BARBEE ws born on 22 Dec., 1926
+1671    Elmer Eugene “Jack” BARBEE

1605        Jesse Gaston BARBEE Sr. was born on 26 May, 1893 and died of a heart attack on
25 July, 1952 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and is buried in the Hico Cemetery.
He was married to (1672) Dovie Pearl (Saylors) BARBEE on 6 Feb., 1910.  She
was born on 15 Aug., 1893, and was the daughter of Henry Clay and Nancy Jane
Coleman Saylors. She died on 3 June, 1944 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and is
buried in the Hico cemetery.  Jesse and Dovie had the following children:
1673    Jesse Guy BARBEE was born on 12 Jan., 1911 and died that day.
1674    Thelma Juanita BARBEE was born on 24 March, 1912
1675    Wesley Clay BARBEE was born on 5 Feb., 1914 and died that day
1676    Dorothy Lee BARBEE was born on 8 Sept., 1915
1677    Alta Oleta BARBEE was born on 23 March, 1919
1678    Jesse Gaston “Jack” BARBEE Jr. was born on 4 July, 1930

1607        Stephen “Doug” BARBEE was born on 20 Aug., 1900 was born on 20 Aug., 1900
in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and died on 11 March, 1954 in Hico.  He is buried in
Hico Cemetery.  He was married to (1679) Bertha Emily (Patterson) BARBEE
                 on 30 June, 1921.  She was born on 9 Feb., 1901 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.
and died on 15 Aug., 1954 in Hico, Texas, and is buried in Hico Cemetery.  They had
the following children:
1680    Donald Douglas BARBEE was born on 20 Jan., 1923
1681    Margaret Maxine BARBEE was born on 16 Aug., 1926
1682    Betty Joann BARBEE was born on 22 May, 1933

1608        Vada Leon (Barbee) PINGLETON was born on 23 Feb., 1904 in Hico, Hamilton
County, Texas, and died on 24 Jan., 1922 in Hico and was buried in Fairy Cemetery.
She was 14 years old when she married, and died 3 years later to the day of a
“female infection”, at the age of 17..  She is buried in Hico Cemetery.  She was married
(1683) A. L. PINGLETON on 24 Jan., 1919.

1610       Fred Terry THOMPSON was born on 21 March, 1880 in Hico, Hamilton County,
Texas, and died on 2 June, 1933 in Hico.  He is buried in Hico Cemetery.  He was
married to (1684) Iona Samantha (Spear) THOMPSON on 25 June, 1916 in
Iometa, Lampassas County, Texas.  She was born on 12 My, 1896 in Temple, Bell
County, Texas, and died on 12 March, 1959 in Houston, Harris County, Texas.  They
had two children:
1685    Kathryn Cornelia THOMPSON  was born on 1 Nov., 1918
1686    Amelia Iona THOMPSON

1611        Willie Amelia (Thompson) COX was born on 3 March, 1884 in Hico, Hamilton
County,Texas, and died on 28 Sept., 1954 in Hico.  She was married to (1687)
Robert Oscar COX. He was born in 1880 and died on 15 Sept., 1940 in DeLeon,
Texas.  It is not known if they had any children.

1613        Dora Lela (Thompson) WRIGHT was born in 1887 in Hico, Hamilton County,
Texas, and died on 20 Jan., 1920 in Hico. She was married to (1688) Wilbur Lee
Wright.  He was born on 15 June, 1884 in Hill County, Texas, and died on 22 Nov.,
1965 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.  They had one known child:
1689    Wilbur Jr. WRIGHT

1614        Daisy Edith THOMPSON was born on 6 July, 1889 and died on 19 May, 1970 in
Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.  She was married to (1734) Arthur John
DANKERS
. He died in Grand Island, Nebraska.  They had one known child:
1735    John “Jack” Jr. DANKERS

1616        Lydia Clara (Thompson) MAHON was born on 9 Oct., 1892 in Hico, Hamilton
County, Texas and died on 21 Aug., 1965 in Hico.  She was married to (1690)
Sidney Johnson MAHON. He was born on 8 Nov., 1892 in Hico, Hamilton
County, Texas and died on 16 Sept., 1965 in Hico.  It is not known if they had any
children.

1617        James W. THOMPSON was born on 1 Dec., 1896 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas,
and died on 6 June, 1942 in Hico.  He was married to (1691) Eda (Seago) 
THOMPSON. She was born on 29 Sept., 1896 in China Springs, Texas, and died on
4 March, 1982 in Hico.  It is not known if they had any children.

1618       Gladys Jewell (Thompson) CANNON was born on 4 July, 1898 in Hico,
Hamilton County, Texas, and died on 31 Dec., 1985 in Hico.  She was married to
(1692) Unknown CANNON.  It is not known if they had any children

1620       William Terry BARBEE was born on 5 May, 1893 in Hico, Hamilton County,
Texas, and died on 23 Oct., 1934 in Weslaco.  He is buried in Weslaco. He was
married to (1694) Lilly Cora (Douthit) BARBEE who was born on 31 Oct.,
1896 in Texas.  She died on 22 April, 1970 in Weslaco, Texas, and is buried there.
They had two known children:
1695    Joe Dale BARBEE was born on 26 Dec., 1923
1696    Leora Zoe BARBEE was born on 10 March, 1930

1621        Herman Adolphus BARBEE was born on 10 Aug., 1895 in Hico, Hamilton
County, Texas, and died on 5 Feb., 1991 in Hico, and is buried in Hico Cemetery.
He was married to (1697) Martha Caroline SANDERS in 1917.  She was born
on 23 Oct., 1896 in Coolidge, Texas, and died on 1 June, 1986.  She is buried in
Hico Cemetery.  They had the following children:
1698    Herman Adolphus BARBEE Jr.  was born on 2 Sept., 1919
1699    Eleanor BARBEE was born on 1 Feb., 1921
1700    Mildred BARBEE was born in 1923

1622        Leroy BARBEE was born on 7 Oct., 1897 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, and
died on 8 July, 1962 in Cuero, Texas.  He is buried in Hico Cemetery.  He served
in World War I and was severely wounded by shrapnel.  He was hit in the arm and
shot in the leg behind the lines in France but managed to drag himself to safety
after several days.  After the war he attended Texas A & M. He was an accomplished artist
and he and his wife Mae travel over the US painting beautiful landscapes.  He left
behind quite a legacy of art work. He was also an accomplished businessman, as he
started and ran a chain of five  chicken hatcheries all over south Texas, making his
headquarters in San Antonio. He had hatcheries in San Antonio, Nixon, Floresville,
Karnes City, and Yorktown, Texas.

He was married to (1701) Ruby Mae (Trott) BARBEE, daughter of Charlie
Harrison Trott and Etta (Pierson) Trott on 1 Nov., 1934 in San Antonio, Texas.
She was born in 1898 in Seguin, Texas, and died on 17 June, 1926 in San Antonio,
Texas.  She is buried in Roselawn Cemetery in San Antonio.  She was married to
Leroy for only 19 months and 10 days.  It is said she died of either typhoid fever or
in childbirth.  They had no children.

Leroy married (1705) Eliza Mae Etta (Wells) BARBEE on 7 Oct., 1926 in Hico,
Hamilton County, Texas.  She was the daughter of Charley Lewis Wells and Hessa
Bell (Cole) Wells.  She died on 12 July, 1994 in San Antonio, Texas.  Mae was also
an accomplished artist and had a beautiful singing voice.  She painted many large
baptisteries in churches in Texas and was the featured soloist in the Baptist Church
in Harlandale, a suburb of San Antonio.  She sang in operas and operettas in San
Antonio on many occasions.  She was noted for her beauty with her pale aqua eyes
and a mane of beautiful auburn hair.  She turned heads wherever she went.  She
came from a family of 13 children.  They had the following children:
1706    Lurline BARBEE was born on 2 Aug., 1927
1707    Barbara Leah BARBEE was born on 27 Jan., 1933
+1708 JoAnn “Jody” (Barbee) DOCKERY was born on 17 Nov., 1935

He was married to (1703) Maddie Lenora (Potts) BARBEE in 1960 in Cuero,
Texas.  She died about 1992 in Cuero, and is buried in the Cuero Cemetery.

1623        Paul Henry BARBEE was born on 23 Dec., 1905 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas
and died on 1 May, 1992 in Mercedes, Texas.  He was married to (1710) Veda
(Fairchild) BARBEE
 and they had one child:
1711    Vickie BARBEE

He was later married to (1712) Ada (Lee) BARBEE

1624        Willie Amelia (Smith) WALKER was born on 20 April, 1889 in Ballinger,
Runnels County, Texas.  She died on 1 June, 1980 in Temple, Texas.  She was
buried in Hico Cemetery, Hico, Hamilton County, Texas.  She was married to
(1713) William Thomas WALKER in 1905.  He was born on 19 Jan., 1886 in
Columbia, Maury County, Tennessee, and died on 8 Aug., 1953 in Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma.  They had one known child:
1714    Ralph Henry WALKER born on 16 Jan., 1909

1625        John Henry SMITH was born on 7 May, 1891 in Hamilton County, Texas, and
died in December, 1959 in Kileen, Bell County, Texas.  He was married to (1715)
Cenia Bell (Newlin) SMITH on 21 Feb., 1921.  She died on 21 April, 1990 in
Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colorado, and is buried in Kileen, Texas.  It is not known
if they had any children.

1626        Ila (Smith) (Wiginton) MOORE was born on 27 July, 1895 in Hico, Hamilton
County,
Texas.  She died on 3 Oct., 1990 in Katy, Texas, and is buried in Hico Cemetery,
Hico, Texas.  She was married to (1716) Roy WIGINTON.

She was married to (1717) Grover C. MOORE.  in 1915.  They had the following
children:
1718    Mary Ann MOORE was born in 1917.  She died on 3 June, 1925 in a
house fire in Fairy community.
1719    Billie Carolyn MOORE was born on 12 Nov., 1899

1627       Cornelia “Nela” (Smith) LACKEY was born on 12 Nov., 1899, and was married
to (1720) Jack LACKEY Sr. They had one known child:
1721    Jack Jr. LACKEY

1629       William A. DAY was born on 9 June, 1877 and died on 30 March, 1920.  He was
married to (1637) Corine (Singletary) DAY, who was born on 14 July, 1897.

1630       John Walter DAY was born on 10 May, 1880 in Hamilton County, Texas, and
died on 11 July, 1935 in Waco, Texas.  He was married to (1638) Daisy
(McAnally) DAY 
on 10 April, 1905 in Hamilton County, Texas.  She died on
12 Oct., 1905 in Hamilton County, Texas.

1631        Sallie (Day) NOAH was born on 25 Dec., 1882, and died on 26 Nov., 1966.  She was
married to (1632) Wiley Edward NOAH on 30 July, 1899.  He died in Sweetwater,
Texas in 1958.

1634        Charles Robison DAY was born on 27 Aug., 1890 in Hico, Hamilton County, Texas,
and died on 5 April, 1973.  He was married to (1640) Margaret (Betterton) DAY.
They had one known child:
1641    Janice Sharon DAY was born on 24 Dec., 1944

1635         Hood V. DAY was born on 5 Sept., 1893 and died on 29 Nov., 1965.  He was
married to (1645) E. M. (Austin) DAY.  It is not known if they had any children.

TENTH GENERATION

1671      Elmer Eugene “Jack” BARBEE was born in 1926 and died in 1990.  He was
married in 1944 to (1731)  Jo Ruth (Whistler) BARBEE, who was born in 1926 and
died in 2001. They had a daughter:
+1732    Jackie Ruth (Barbee) SMITH

1708    JoAnn “Jody” (Barbee) DOCKERY was born on 17 Nov., 1935 and lived in San Antonio.
She is married to (1834) Ted DOCKERY.  They were both school teachers and school
administrators, and as of 2003 had been retired for about 10 years.  They live in the country
between Boerne and San Antonio Texas, and have a home also on Lake Lyndon Baines
             Johnson.  In 2003 they traveled to New York, London, and Paris to celebrate their 48th
wedding anniversary.  They have three sons.         

ELEVENTH GENERATION

1732    Jackie Ruth (Barbee) SMITH was born in 1947 and married (1733) Edward C.
Smith 
in 1984.  He was born in 1945 and is retired from IBM.  They live in Lubbock,
Texas as of 2003.  Jackie is active in Barbee genealogy, and there are two websites
listed in “SOURCES” that were prepared by the couple.  Ed has restored some of the
photos in this website.

SOURCES

1.    Research entitled “Descendants of John Gaston BARBEE – FEB. 12, 2003″ by Edward C..
Smith of Lubbock, Texas, and wife Jackie, who is a Barbee.  Further information may
be obtained from these websites:
http://briefcase.yahoo.com/ecjrsmith
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/m/i/E-Smith-NY/index.html

                                                                        ADDENDA

1.      A report on John Gaston Barbee 

M. I. “Butch” Knudson Jr., son of M. I. Knudson, prepared this report for the Hico Public School, Hico, Hamilton County, Texas, in 1964. It supposedly helped obtain Texas State Historical recognition for the homestead.

Plot of Barbee Family Cemetery on M.I. Knudson farm, 5 miles east of Hico, Texas
________ ________ ________ ________ _______ _______ ______ _______
|X  Abigail Barbee  (#8)                                     XX  Infant daughters of Barbee (#4)
|   3/11/1793-4/4/1878                                             26/12/1873 
|
|
|                X  John Gaston Barbee (#7)
|                    9/9/1832-11/8/1921                                          NORTH

|                                                                                                         /|\
|                                                                                                           |
|     __________________
|     | Monument to Barbee    |
|     |        and wife (#9)           |
|     |_________________|
|
|                                                                                         X  Sophronia Barbee  (#3)
|                                                                                               16/2/1861-6/10/1870
|                                                            X  Cornelia Barbee (#5)
|                                                                  26/2/1876 – 1/1/1877
|
|
|
|                 X Amelia Barbee (#6)
|                     30/11/1832 – 26/8/1889
|                                                                                X  James M. Barbee (#2)
|                                                                                     20/12/1856 – 2/1/1880
|
|                                                    X  Willis A. Barbee (#1)
|                                                          1/2/1863 – 13/12/1864
|
| ______  ____ _____ ______ ______ ______ _____ ____ _____ _____ ____ ____
(not to scale – approximately 18 yards north-south)

Hico family plot plus non-JGB’s in family plot Plus JGB children not in family plot, in date order:
8        Abigail Barbee                                 3 Nov., 1793 – 4 April, 1878
9        Monument to Barbee and Wife
7        John Gaston Barbee                        9 Sept., 1832 – 11 Aug., 1921
6.       Amelia Barbee                                  30 Nov., 1832 – 26 Aug., 1889
14.     Oliva Amanda Barbee Day             18 Jan., 1854 – 30 May, 1923
13.     John Wesley Barbee                        17 June, 1856 – 24 July, 1904
(Can John Wesley and James M. be so close in birth dates? JWB tombstone says 1856, “A History of Hamilton County Texas”, page 113, says 1853.  However, 1853 puts JWB awfully close to Olivia’s birth date of Jan., 1854)
2.       James M. Barbee                             20 Dec., 1856 – 2 Jan., 1880
11.     Cornelia Barbee Thompson            29 Oct., 1858 – 7 Sept., 1946
3.       Sophronia Barbee                             16 Feb., 1861 – 6 Oct., 1870
12.     E. Adolphus Barbee                          July, 1862 – 16 Feb., 1937
1.       Willis A. Barbee                                 1 Feb., 1863 – 13 Dec., 1864
10.    Amelia Jessie Barbee Smith             1 Jan., 1869 – 4 Feb., 1904
4.      Infant daughters of Barbee               26 Dec., 1873
5.      Cornelia Barbee                                  29 Feb., 1876 – 1 Jan, 1877
(Why another Cornelia when Cornelia Barbee Thompson is still alive?)

Others listed in plot in Hamilton county, Texas cemetery records

Caroline E.D. Phillips, Mother of D.S. Laro & C. M. Lang, 14 Sept., 1873 – 5 Jan., 1899
Infant son of D.S. & A. E. Laro, 10 Jan., 1887 – 7 Feb., 1887
Sarah A. Donathan, wife of J. M. Donathan, 8 Aug., 1858 – 22 April, 1877
Infant daughters of W. T. & Cornelia Thompson, born & died 1 Aug., 1891
Infant son of W. T. & Cornelia Thompson, 19 April, 1886 – 18 May, 1886
One Mae Gee, 10 Dec., 1908 – 20 Feb., 1994  (Hamilton Herald News)
Mary Ann Key, mother of S. J. Barbee, 1816 – 6 Jan., 1899

John Gaston BARBEE ~Hico Pioneer

John Gaston BARBEE was a pioneer “of broad vision and determination”, a member of a race of men who had empire in their brains and who laid the solid foundation on which the mighty commonwealth of Texas was firmly fixed.  He was on board the first boat that ever sailed up the Trinity River.  He was a citizen of Alabama before the battle of San Jacinto stirred the patriotic zeal of men who loved liberty everywhere.”  Thus says an obituary published in the Hico News Review on 18 August, 1921.  The article continues, “he was present when the Red Man made his home in the wilds of their lands and he joined in the campaigns that were necessarily launched from time to time to push the Indians farther West, to the land of the setting sun, to make room for the stalwart treat of the myriad of Anglo-Saxons who were to people this land with that same conquering determination that has aroused the admiration of the world and written in glowing letters an illustrious page in Texas history”.

John Barbee was born 9 Sept., 1832 in Jones County, Tennessee.  When he was three, his family moved to Alabama, where John lived until he was nineteen.  In 1851 he came to Texas and sailed up the Trinity River to Leon County.  It was there that he met Amelia Carson, whom he married the following year.

In 1859 he moved his family to Hamilton County, where he bought a large tract of fertile land and stocked it with many cattle and sheep.  Two years after he arrived in Hamilton County, Barbee joined the Confederate Army in Texas.  He served with distinction in Gane’s Brigade under Captain Goodrich.
He served with distinction in Gano’s Brigade under Captain Goodrich. (From “A History
of Hamilton County Texas.  Library of Congress Catalogue Card No. 79-880-32.
Copyright 1979, Hamilton County Historical Commission, Hamilton, TX 76531)

Mrs. Sylvia DAY, wife of John BARBEE’s great grandson T.J. DAY of Escondido California, has done a great deal of research into the family history.  She says ten children were born to John BARBEE and wife, but evidence shows there were eleven BARBEE children.  Four of these died when they were babies.  One headstone in the family cemetery bears the inscription “Infant Daughters of J.G. and Amelia BARBEE, December 26, 1873,” indicating a multiple birth.  Two other headstones show babies of J.G. BARBEE buried here: “Willis A. BARBEE, February 1, 1863 – December 13, 1864,” and “Cornelia BARBEE, February 29 1876 – January 1877.”  Those who survived infancy were Olivia Amanda, Cornelia, John Wesley, James, Safronia, E. Adolphus, and Amelia Jessie.
There evidently were two Cornelia’s, as the headstone above lists one of them and the obituary lists a daughter, Mrs. Cornelia Thompson as one of J.G. BARBEE’s surviving children in 1921).

Why another Cornelia when Cornelia BARBEE Thompson is still alive?
Safronia died when she was nine years old, and James was killed at age 24 in a duel in Mexico [ed. note - possibly Matador, Texas - see further in this addenda], according to dates on the headstones in the family cemetery.  Three of the seven survived John BARBEE himself, according to the obituary of August 18, 1921.  Cornelia, whose married name was Thompson, was listed as living in Hico.  Olivia Amanda was married to Will DAY and lived in Sweetwater.  E.A. BARBEE, probably the Adolphus listed by Mrs. Sylvia DAY, lived in Mercedes, Texas.  Mrs. Cornelia Smith Lackey, of Hico, is the daughter of the youngest BARBEE daughter, Amelia Jessie, whose married name was Smith.  Amelia Jessie BARBEE Smith and Cornelia BARBEE Thompson and Olivia Amanda BARBEE Day are buried in the Hico cemetery.  Mrs. Smith having preceded her father in death by several years.  Mrs. Lackey says that John Wesley BARBEE, who also died before his father did, is buried in the Fairy Cemetery.

Mrs. DAY says Amelia Carson BARBEE was so small that everyone called her “Little Mama.”  She had black hair that she wore in short curls.  She seems to have been quite a generous person who was kind to everyone who came along.  She must have been a good wife to John if one is to judge by the feeling expressed in the passage he had carved on her tombstone. Still legible are these lines:
“A loved one has gone from our circle,
On earth we shall meet her no more.
She has gone to her home in Heaven
and all her afflictions are o’er.”

She died in 1889 and was laid to rest in the family cemetery, where six of her children had already been buried.  John BARBEE outlived Amelia thirty-two years, during which he tried married life twice more, but each of these marriages was unsuccessful, and he spent his old days, according to Mrs. DAY, “living around” with his children.  According to the obituary, he left Hico approximately three weeks before his death to visit in the home of his son E.A. BARBEE at Mercedes, where he died on 11 Aug., 1921.  His body ws returned to Hico, and he was buried in the family cemetery on Sunday, 14 Aug., 1921.

John BARBEE was a stocky built Irishman [sic], standing five feet nine inches tall.  Like most men of his time, he wore a mustache.  He was a nice looking red complexioned man, and neat in his dress.  Mrs. DAY says, “He was at one time a very wealthy man but was almost broke when he died.  he was pretty tough when he was young, but had simmered down a bit in his oder days.  He was a jolly man, not moody.”

All evidence points to his having been devoted to his family.  Whether his mother came to the Hico area as early as 1859, we do not know, but her gravestone in the family cemetery indicates that she must have been a member of John BARBEE’s household, where she died in 1878.

The 1860 Census of the United States, Texas, Leon County, Centerville, page 251B shows
R. Barbee, male, 65, and Abigail Barbee, female, 65 as living in dwelling 199, occupation
farmer, birthplace for both, NC

When his son James was shot in a duel in Mexico, Mrs. DAY says that BARBEE went to Mexico and brought the body back to be placed in the family cemetery.  Only a man who experienced deep family ties would have made such a trip at that time.  We do not now where in Mexico James BARBEE was killed, but the nearest Mexican territory to Hico is approximately 250 miles, and the most likely spot for such a duel to have occurred was Laredo, approximately 400 miles away.  The marker at James’s grave indicates that he was killed on January 2, 1880.

6/2000: Recent articles received from Jess W. Mason indicates that the shoot-out took
place in Matador, TX.  This is a town up towards Lubbock, TX.  Another report indicates
a family problem between James and John Gaston, and a length of time passing before
retrieving the body for burial in the family plot.  If true, then agreeably John Gaston’s
deep family ties caused him to send hands to retrieve his son’s body for burial in the family
plot.

John BARBEE must have been a stern disciplinarian as two stories seem to indicatge.  When Olivaia Amanda was planning to marry Will DAY, John BARBEE was opposed to the union and made his objections so strongly felt, that Olivia filed a statement with the county clerk of Hamilton County renouncing all claims on the BARBEE family and upon the BARBEE property.

In the Hamilton County Courthouse, Deed Record D, Pg. 205, Olivia Amanda Barbee
entered the following:
Pleasant Hill, Hamilton County
Apr. the 28th 1872

Dear Father & Mother & to all hoom it may concern.  That I do this day pledge my sacred
word & honor that I Olivia Amanda Barbee will never run away or mary on Wm. Day of
said county without my Father’s consent & if I relinquish all of my right & title to all of My
Father & Mother’s property to them & further more I forsake my Father & Mother & all of
the family for life & never will I expect to be allowed to come to my Fathers House any
more while life last him as he so much opposed to my marrying a boy who has never tho
first time of what it takes to take care of a wife.
I do sign this with my own consent & free will.  Olivia Amanda Barbee
Witness:
Amelia Barbee

Another incident indicating his sternness is found in Mrs. DAY’s story of how he would sit on the front porch of his home with a whip close at hand to keep his grandchildren, who were visiting there, from disturbing the nest of wrens that built each spring in an old hunting horn that he kept hanging on the porch.  However, this discipline does not seem to have harmed his children, but rather to have developed a hardiness and fortitude that was necessary to survive under frontier conditions.  When Indians attacked the school at Warlene Valley on the Leon River in July 1867 and murdered the teacher, Miss Ann Whitney, they captured Olivia Amanda Barbee.  An Indian put her up behind him on a horse, and “when his attention was distracted by a call from some of his companions, Olivia slid off and ran into the dense underbrush,” where she was found some 24 hours later by settlers who were searching the area.  That kind of grit is not found in pampered children.

John Barbee, like most pioneers, was careful about choosing his land and homesite.  Since he was one of the first settlers in the Hico area, he had first choice of the land.  He chose a large tract along the Bosque River, which furnished an ample water supply for his stock.  The land in the river valley was very fertile and supported grass “so tall that it could hide a cow lying down and rise above the stirrups of a rider on horseback.”  Since he was a rancher, this type of land was ideal for him and many others like him.  Barbee was no less careless with building his home than he was in choosing his land.  He placed his homesite on the south side of a rise in the land to protect it from the north wind, and overlooking a valley at the bottom of which runs the Bosque River. Sitting on the front porch, Barbee could see the undulating green of the Bosque Valley before him and, through a gap in the hills, all the way to the mountains at Meridian in the southeast.

Built of limestone quarried near Hico the walls of his house were in double columns of rocks each of which was a foot thick.  It was a four room house, not counting the hall and the storage room. The rooms were spacious with high ceilings and plenty of broad windows for comfortable living.  The structure was “L” shaped with a large front porch.  On the broad keystone above the front door, John Barbee carved his brand “-B”, which still reminds those who enter there that each pioneer cowman had his own “coat-of-arms”.  The pine lumber used in building the house was hauled on wagons pulled by oxen from Bremond, Texas, a distance of some 116 miles to the southeast.  Mrs. DAY says that all the family speak of his home as John BARBEE’s “pride and Joy”, and they report that it took four years to complete its structure.  She has often heard them speak of its three fireplaces and of the long front porch, where he kept two or three hives of bees.

Dear as the house itself must have been to his heart, one other spot on the place was more sacred to John BARBEE; the family cemetery.  It stands atop a small hill about a half a mile from the house.  In it are buried almost all of his immediate family and BARBEE himself.  After his death, his old homestead began to deteriorate until finally it was completely deserted and practically forgotten.  Even in this state, however, the sturdy old facade assured the occasional visitor that the old house ws not just an ordinary one.  Its wall were still strong, and all the rockwork was in perfect condition.  Seeing this and realizing that restoration was possible, M.I. Knudson bought the house and about 175 acres surrounding it.  In 1957 he had the house cleaned up and completely redone on the inside.  He also added another rock section on the big “L” side, and then he moved his family in.  Again the house was a place for living and dreaming and planning.  In September 1963, it was awarded a medallion by the Texas Historical Survey Committee for being the oldest standing house around Hico.

John BARBEE also built the first cotton gin west of Waco at “Old Hico”.  The date of the building of the gin is disputed.  One opinion is that the gin was built in 1870 and was operated until 1880, when the Texas Central Railroad was built through this country and Hico was moved to it on the Bosque.  Another opinion is that the gin was finished in 1879 and was used less than a year before Hico was moved.  One fact agreed on was that it was a rock gin, 5 miles east on Honey Creek near “Blue Hole”, that was said to have no bottom.

The obituary written at the time of his death says, “In 1880 when the railroad was built through this country he was active in building the city by the Bosque, being engaged in the lumber, hotel, grocery, and mercantile business here.  Besides these he continued to devote much of his time to the cattle raising industry.”  Investigations reveal that he must have been a very controversial figure, even in his old days.  Mrs. Sylvia DAY’s letter describes him as a “fabulous old tough Texan.”  From the stories she has collected from members of his family, she has drawn the conclusion that “if there was not something going on, he made a diligent effort to start something.”  She pictures him as being “so tough, he was not afraid to face a tribe of Indians alone if he had to – yhet with a hearth so soft that he would not permit anyone to disturb the little wrens that came each spring to nest on his front porch.”  He was definitely a man of contrasts, as can be seen from Mrs. DAY’s stories as well as from those told by old- timers still living in Hico who remember John BARBEE in his middle and later years.  Some accounts picture him in a favorable light, but others do not.

Frank Smith, who has lived in Hico for 90 Years, used to herd sheep for BARBEE.  He says that there was no better or fairer man than BARBEE in this part of the country.  Smith worked for BARBEE for 15 years without having any trouble with him in any way.  However, Fred Hyles of Hico says that his father Frank Hyles came to Texas from Alabama at the age of 21 and had quite a different experience with BARBEE When Frank Hyles came to this part of Texas, he was engaged by BARBEE to do farm work.  In time Hyles had trouble with BARBEE’s nephew over a plow horse, and the two became engaged in a fight.  At that time, according to Hyles, it was generally understood in the area that John BARBEE was head of the Ku Klux Klan at Hico; and a short time after the aforementioned fight, Hyles was hauled out of bed one night by members of the Klan and carried to the river, where he was severely beaten and warned to leave the country.

Another confused issue about BARBEE was his attitude toward the Indians of this region.  Frank Smith said that he tried to get the people to leave the Indians alone and treat them like human beings.  Smith also claims that Barbee even let the Indians camp on his land when they were passing through.  On the other hand, Mrs. DAY hints that BARBEE had to stand up against the Indians by himself, and the obituary says that he took part in the last big Indian fight around here – the fight that took place on the point of a mountain near Fairy.

Upon another occasion, it seems that he himself barely escaped the wrath of a mob.  Mrs. DAY’s account of this incident is as follows:
” He was fencing his ranch and found on going back to build one day, a note telling him, if
he did not stop fencing off land, he would be hanged.  He kept on building fence.  A bunch
of men came to his house to hang him.  He had his wife tell them he was gone, while he hid
in the house.”

Like many other Texans of his time, he was “fast on the draw”, and is credited with having killed two men and having wounded at least one other.  One of the men he killed was attempting to blackmail him.  He was tried and, according to Mrs. DAY, “was almost sent to prison but was set free before he put on prison garb or was clean shaven”.  The other man he killed was one of his ranch hands who Mrs. DAY says was making improper advances toward Mrs. BARBEE’s sister. If he was tried for this murder, this writer has found no mention of it.  Mrs. DAY does say the he and the ranch hand had bitter words over the affair and that later when the man started for his gun, BARBEE “beat him to the draw.”  Perhaps it was one of those “self defense”
affairs that pioneers considered outside the jurisdiction of the grand juries and courts of law.  The man whom he shot but did not kill was a business partner and good friend of BARBEE, who Mrs. DAY names as one Dave Barron.

Many other stories of John Gaston BARBEE must lie somewhere unwritten and untold; above all else, a rugged individualist – a hardy soul with a vision that reached beyond his own era.  He expanded his boundless energy and ambition in helping to establish a community and in building a home that would withstand the wear and tear of time.  The sturdy old home, facing south toward the Bosque, holds within its walls something of the strength and courage of its builder.  It is entering into its second century of existence with a special dignity and a certain promise – a promise to hold tight the stories that a new generation of historians would like to extract from its stones.

BIBIOGRAPHY:
Day, Sylvia – Three letters to M.I. Knudson, dated 16 Sept., 1962, 19 Oct., 1962, and 7 Feb.,
1964, and in the possession of M.E. Knudson, Hico, Texas.
“E.A. Barbee’s Gin and Compress”, Hico News Review, 18 Dec., 1908, section 3, pg. 13
Hyles, Frank – Interview, 19 Feb., 1964 in Hico, Texas
Lackey, Mrs. Jack – Interview, 4 March, 1964 in Hico, Texas
“Obituary of John Gaston Barbee” – Copied by Mrs. Sylvia Day from a newspaper clipping
taken from a Hico newspaper a week after John Gaston Barbee’s death, 11 Aug., 1921
Pool, Oran Jo, A History of Hamilton County, The University of Texas, 1954
Smith, Frank – Interview, 18 Jan., 1964 in Hico, Texas

2.      The Death of James M. Barbee

Harry H. Campbell in his book “The Early History of Motley County”, gives his description of the scene between two cowboys shooting each other in a log cabin: Jim Harkey was working for the Spur Cattle Company and Jim Barbee was working for the Jingle Bob Cattle Company.  The night of 1 January, 1880, these two boys killed each other in the old log cabin at Cottonwood Mott.  At the time there were two freighters hauling corn from San Saba to headqurters on Hall Creek, and they stayed all night at this camp.  The boys were getting supper at the time when Jim Barbee started singing a song, some little cowpuncher’s song.  Jim Harkey said: “That’s a fool song you’re singing!”  Barbee probably said it was all right.  Harkey then said: “No one but a damn fool would sing it!”  Both had six shooters on and they pulled together.  Barbee was killed by the first shot.  Harkey was shot square through the hip, right through the kidneys, and was also killed.  One of the freighters went to the corral and got the first horse he could catch.  He rode to the Spur headquarters on Hall Creek, formerly Pease River.  Dick Hudson was ranch foreman at the time.  They went down at once.

The freighters had a new wagon sheet they cut in half and buried Harkey in one half and Barbee in the other.  The next May, John Hall, brother of Jim Hall the owner, went there from San Saba with a coffin.  He was accompanied by a brother of Jim Harkey.  I saw them dig the bodies up and identified Harkey’s.  They put him in his coffin, nailed it down, and hauled him back to San Saba.  Jim Barbee was a son of John Barbee, who lived in Hico, where he had a store and ran cattle.  Earlier, Jim and his father had a falling out and Jim, knowing where I was living at this time, asked me for a job.  When I left, he was still buried there, but I hear that old man Barbee later sent his outfit and moved him for reburial in Hico.

From and article in “Co-Op Power” by George Macias: “Anyone who would sing a song like that is a (bleep) fool,” said the cowboy from the Jingle Bob Cattle Company.  “You’re a liar, that’s a (bleep) good song,” said the other cowboy, pausing in the middle of “Yankee Doodle.”  In a matter of moments the two cowboys lay dead, nevermore to curse, sing, or draw a six gun.  The story of these two cowboys, Jim Barbee and Jim Harkey, is only one of the tales of the Matador Ranch.

From: “The Life of a New Mexico Lawman – Mean as Hell”  by Dee Harkey
During this time, Jim Harkey had quit working for Wash Tanklesee and was working for the Hall brothers.  The had a ranch on Richened Creek, in San Saba County, and they drove trail herds to the Panhandle of Texas for a good many years, and located them on a ranch on the head of the Pease River, in the Panhandle.

In February, 1878, Jim was killed up there by Jim Barbee.  They were living together in a log cabin with a stick and dirt chimney.  The house had a door sawed out, and the ends of the logs had boards nailed on them for door facings.  The cracks between the logs were large enough for a man to stick his arm through.  These boys were cowhands, and they rode drift line and ate together, though they were working for different companies.

The day of the killing, they both got back to camp early and lay around the camp.  Barbee told Jim that day that the reason he was out there was because he had had a difficulty with his father and had tried to stab him with a burcher knife.  Jim had been chiding Barbee about attempting to stab his father, and that seemed to be why Barbee shot him.

Jim started to fix something to eat, and he was singing “Yankee Doodle”.  Barbee told him that anybody who would sing a song like that was a damned fool.  Jim thought Barbee was joking, so he said, “You’re a liar, that’s a damn good song.”  So Barbee went outside, revolved his pistol, and came back to the door and ran his left arm between the cracks of the log house and around the door facing.  He had his pistol cocked in his right hand.  He told Jim that he was going to kill him, and he shot at the same time.  Jim had his pistol Buckled around.  The bullet Barbee fired hit Jim over the right hip and came out over the left hip.  The shot four times each.  Jim shot Barbee four times through the heart, but Barbee hit only the one time.  Barbee dropped his pistol and fell, and Jim laid his pistol across Barbee’s and walked outside.  He met the freighter for the Hall Ranch who had just got there.  Jim gave the facts of the shooting to him.  The freighter told Jim that he saw Barbee come out of the house as he was driving up and revolve his pistol and walk back to the door.  Jim saddled his horse and sent the freighter over to Hall’s headquarters for Dick Hudson, who was the Hall brothers’ boss.  When Hudson came, Jim told him all about the shooting and then told him that he wanted done with his money and belongings.  Then Jim laid down and died in a few minutes.  Hudson and the freighter rolled Barbee and Jim up in a pair of blankets and a wagon sheet, and laid them side by side in a grave about eighteen inches deep which they dug with an axe.

About two months later, Joe rigged up a team and spring wagon and sent me to bring Jim’s body back home to bury in the family graveyard at Richland Springs.  He gave me a .44 Winchester and two boxes of cartridges to take with me.  I got a boy named Hall to go with me, and Joe armed him also.  Joe had a coffin made and put it in a box made air tight, then he put chains around the box and fastened it down to the wagon so it would not move.

Joe gave me a batch of grub-flour, coffee, etc. – and a cooking outfit, and we pulled out.  It was about 350 miles to where Jim’s body was buried.  It took us twenty-one days to reach our destination.  When I got to Buffalo Gap, I got a letter from Jim Barbee’s father saying that he had been up there and got his son’s body, or he thought it was his son’s body, and had carried it home and buried it in their family graveyard, and if I found that he had Jim Harkey’s body that I should take his boy’s body and give it a nice burial.  He was buried date unknown in Barbee Family Cemetery, Knudson Property, Hico, Texas.  From Jess W. Mason, 6/3/00.


 

 

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